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WW1 Armor Revisited

n by Martin Waligorski
n photos by Peter Alsterberg


Trend or Coincidence?

Recent years brought back the interest for World War 1 models, both on the armor and the aircraft modelling scenes. Here a few examples of the early armored vehicles in model form. All three models have been displayed at the last year's IPMS Open competition, where the photos were taken. Enjoy - and get inspired!

Kjetil Gulli built the British Mk. IV Tadpole tank from the Emhar kit in 1/35th scale. This massive vehicle existed only in prototype form -  it never did go into production due to flexing problems. The Emhar kit is reportedly of fair quality, however, as can be seen, it can be turned into an impressive model straight-from-the-box.

The well-known British Mk. I was the first tank in service ever. Here a captured example with German markings. Lars Heydecke built this award-winning model. What is not obvious from the picture is that the scale of the model is... 1/76.

Also here a Mk. I and the same small scale, but this time the modeller is Andreas Bennwik. Note the extensive, but realistic weathering and a simple but very effective base.

 

Another prize-winning creation of  Kjetil Gulli. The Medium A Whippet was only the world's second production tank. It was also lighter and more agile than the heavy Mk. I. Also this model has been built from 1/35 Emhar kit with no modifications.

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